Dare to Read

October 9, 2011

Quote from Federico Garcia-Lorca

Filed under: Federico García Lorca,On Writing,Quotes,Theater — carmenferreiroesteban @ 9:15 am
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“theatre is poetry that rises from the book and becomes human enough to talk and shout, weep and despair.”

Federico Garcia Lorca.

August 19, 2011

Requiem for Federico

by Carmen Ferreiro-Esteban

to Federico Garcia Lorca

In August 18, 1936, Federico Garcia Lorca was taken prisoner by Nationalist militia in Granada, during the chaos that followed the failed military coup that ignited the Spanish Civil War. He was never seen again, and his tomb was never found.

He had been born in Granada in 1898 and, by the time of his death he was an internationally renowned poet and playwright.

Interested in the Spanish folklore in his youth he published Libro de poemas (1921) and Romancero Gitano (“The Gypsy Ballads”) (1928). Some of these early poems (La Tarara, Verde que te quiero verde, Anda jaleo, Romance de la luna) have become deeply engraved in the Spanish subconscious and are still widely sang today.

Romance de la Luna.

Verde que te quiero verde.

De los cuatro muleros.

Lorca was also an accomplished pianist and (as reflected in his poems) a lover of the Cante Jondo or “deep song” performed by singer and guitarists in his native Andalucia. A passion he shared with the renowned Spanish composer Manuel de Falla.

Falla’s ballet El Amor Brujo was brought to the screen by Carlos Saura in the 1980s with Antonio Gadés and Cristina Hoyos.

As was Lorca’s play, Bodas de Sangre.

Lorca’s other two plays in the Rural Spain trilogy, Yerma (about the impossible yearning of a barren woman for a child) and La Casa de Bernarda Alba (a tragedy that explores the repression suffered by women in traditionalist Spain) have also been filmed. La casa de Bernarda Alba by Mario Camus in 1982 and Yerma by Pilar Távora in 1998.

The three plays are still performed today both at University Drama representations and at mainstream theaters.

To escape a deep depression brought about by an unrequited love and his conflicted feelings about his homosexuality, Lorca traveled to New York where he lived in 1929-1930. NYC made a profound impression in him. During his visits to Harlem and later in his trip to Cuba, he discovered and fell in love with African-American spirituals which reminded him of Spain’s “deep songs.”. All these experiences, coagulated in his book Poet in New York.

Years later, the Canadian bard, Leonard Cohen discovered Lorca’s book in a Montreal bookstore. Lorca became Cohen’s idol so much so he named his daughter after him (Lorca).

Cohen’s translated and set to music one of Lorca’s poems Pequeño Vals Vienés. You may recognize this hauntingly beautiful song as Take This Waltz.

Apart from the films based on his plays, several movies have been made with Lorca himself as protagonist. (Go here http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0305030/ for a complete list). Among them, La Desaparición De García Lorca (1996) with Andy García, terribly miscast as Lorca, and the deeply moving Little Ashes (2009),

In Little Ashes, Robert Pattison, of Harry Potter and Twilight fame, does a moving portrait of the Surrealistic painter Salvador Dali and the Spanish actor, Javier Beltrán, plays Lorca as a young man in the fictionalized account of the time they spent together, and with the well-known director Luis Buñuel, in the Residencia de Estudiantes de Madrid. You can read my review at http://www.notreadyforgrannypanties.com/2011/06/little-ashes.html

Later Dali and Buñuel moved to Paris where they collaborated in the surrealist film A chien Andalous,

<a href="http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docid=3830396680029577028&hl=en&fs=true“><embed id=VideoPlayback src=http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docid=3830396680029577028&hl=en&fs=true style=width:400px;height:326px allowFullScreen=true allowScriptAccess=always type=application/x-shockwave-flash> </embed>

as shocking and provoking today, as it was in 1929 when it was conceived.

Lorca believed the title of the film (totally unrelated to its content) was meant as an insult to him. For as he says in Little Ashes, “I’m the only andaluz they know.”

His death at 38 put an early end to this talented poet, playwright, theater director (he travelled with a tent, La Barraca, through Spain in the 1930s, bringing the classical theater for free to towns and villages), and painter. You can see a gallery of Lorca’s pictures here: http://www.slide.com/r/3s4clS893z9ZetLN0MEKGwknzkdVTTEU?fbr=1

As my personal requiem for Lorca, I made him one of the immortals in my novel Garlic for Breakfast (https://carmenferreiroesteban.wordpress.com/2010/12/27/garlic-for-breakfast-8-by-carmen-ferreiro-esteban/).

This episodic review does no justice to the multiple artistic facets of this immensely talented poet, but I hope it has awaken your interest to learn more.

July 6, 2011

Federico García Lorca: In memoriam

by Carmen Ferreiro-Esteban

 

 

 

 

Federico García Lorca, one of the greatest Spanish poets of all times, was born in Granada (Spain) on June 5, 1898.

He was killed at the peak of his creative career on August 19, 1936.

This amazing documentary by Jose Asuncion Silva covers his life in four Utube videos.

http://youtu.be/b9FCP41-GVo

http://youtu.be/8K5D6uy6aHc

http://youtu.be/WRHqwG0tqcA

http://youtu.be/kdp6fc7xRmk

If you speak Spanish I highly recommend you check them out.

If you don’t and want to know more about Lorca, you may watch Little Ashes, a beautiful and little known movie about his friendship and impossible relationship with the Surrealist painter Salvador Dalí. See my review here: http://www.notreadyforgrannypanties.com/2011/06/little-ashes.html

And if you happen to live in Austin, TX and are an actor you are in luck because Wondrous Strange Players is holding auditions July 12 and 13 for Lorca’s play Blood Wedding.  http://austinlivetheatre.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2294:auditions-for-blood-wedding-by-garcia-lorca-wondrous-strange-players-july-&catid=678:wondrous-strange-players

And so, in his work, Federico lives!

June 30, 2011

Federico García Lorca´s Blood Wedding in L.A.

Filed under: Federico García Lorca,Theater — carmenferreiroesteban @ 9:33 pm
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If you live in L.A. you are in luck. You can watch Federico García Lorca´s 1933 masterpiece Blood Wedding staged by director Jon Lawrence Rivera at the Odyssey Theatre Ensemble, 2055 S. Sepulveda Blvd., West L.A..

The story of a bride that runs away with her former lover (now married) on her wedding night originally set in 1933 rural southern Spain is transplanted this time to 1952 central California.

For a full review and times, you can click here http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/culturemonster/2011/06/theater-review-blood-wedding-at-the-odyssey-theatre-1.htm

January 27, 2011

Federico Garcia Lorca Play

Filed under: Theater — carmenferreiroesteban @ 10:44 pm
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If you live in NYC or close enough to visit for the day, and like theater, you may want to stop by The Repertorio Español and watch a play by Federico García Lorca: Así que pasen cinco años (Once Five Years Pass).

As you may remember García Lorca is one of the protagonists of my paranormal story Garlic for Breakfast.

This is what the reviewer at the Repertorio español website says about the play:

“A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see one of Lorca’s least known masterpieces

“Think you know Lorca? Think twice. “Así que pasen cinco años,” (Once Five Years Pass) is García Lorca’s most intimate work. The play stems from García Lorca’s desire to create a theater of “new and advanced forms and theories.” In René Buch’s words “‘Once Five Years Pass’ is one of García Lorca’s most complex and controversial plays, an exploration of his emotional and intellectual life and a result of his days living in New York.”

“Federico García Lorca’s plays denounce injustice, expose the reality of the lives of the underdog and speak out loud about themes that are hushed by society. “Así que pasen cinco años” is not an exception. With this play, García Lorca pushes through boundaries and engages the audience in a theatrical experience where no theme is taboo. In the story, a young man and a woman have decided to wait five years before getting married. As five years pass there’s another woman that’s in love with the young man but he rejects her as it is his desire to marry his fiancée. Once five years pass, the bride-to-be abandons her fiancée, the young man, who in turn seeks to recover the love of the woman he rejected. But love is not eternal and an unexpected event infiltrates time and bringing surprising repercussions for the young man.

“This is one of García Lorca’s most elaborate, challenging and least produced plays. It invites the audience to reflect on themes of emotions, pride, sex and gender, as relevant today as when García Lorca wrote the play in 1931, precisely five years before his death.

http://www.repertorio.org/productions/index.php?area=ind&id=141